Category

Estate Planning
probate court change of will
Legal Terminology Self-proved will laws A will that can be validated without the use of a probate court. Such a will usually requires the presence of witnesses who attest to the will’s validity. Presumption of Continuity When no circumstances exist that suggest a will lacks validity or has been revoked, the burden shifts from a...
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San Antonio Probate
Introduction If you are an executor or administrator of an estate in Texas, you may be wondering what to do about debt collectors. After all, the last thing you want is for the estate to be hounded by creditors. Read on to find out more about how to deal with debt collectors in independent probate...
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If you’re considering making an online will, you might be wondering if it’s actually legal. The short answer is yes, an online will is just as valid as a handwritten one – as long as it meets all the requirements of a regular will. Keep reading to learn more about what makes a will valid,...
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San Antonio Probate
What’s the Difference Between an Estate Plan and a Living Trust? If you’re planning for the future of your estate, you may be wondering what the difference is between an estate plan and a living trust. Some people believe they are the same thing. But the truth is they aren’t. There is a significant difference...
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Probate Terms A probate case is a legal proceeding to administer the estate of a person who has died. There are common terms in probate cases that you should know. In this article, we will define some of these terms. The following is a list of the most commonly used terms in probate cases: Administrator...
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Probate Statute of Limitations
Statute of Limitations on Estate Claims The statute of limitations is a law that limits the amount of time a person has to file a lawsuit against another person or entity. The statute of limitations on claims against a decedent’s estate, commonly referred to as the probate statute of limitations, varies from state to state....
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Exclusive Jurisdiction and the Texas Probate Court
Chief Duties of the Texas Probate Court The chief duties of the probate court are to supervise the probate of wills and the administration of estates. The probate process, including the distribution of the estate’s assets, is governed by the Texas Estates Code and the Texas Probate Code. In most cases in Texas, probate is...
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