Category

Estate Planning
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Have you ever wondered if someone can inherit from an estate if they kill their spouse? This is what is commonly called the “Slayer Rule”. In this blog post, we will explore the realities of the law in Texas. What is a will? In Texas, a will is a legal document that outlines how you...
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Introduction A living trust is a legal arrangement in which you, the grantor, transfer property to a trustee. The trustee then manages the property for the benefit of a named beneficiary or beneficiaries. Living trusts are created during the grantor’s lifetime and can be revocable or irrevocable. Texas has specific laws governing living trusts, so...
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Introduction Proving the adopted status of a family member in Texas can be difficult if you don’t have the right documentation. Learn what you need to know in this blog post. The Importance of Proving Adopted Status When an individual in Texas wants to adopt a family member, they must first prove their status as...
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Introduction In Texas, a will must be in writing and signed by the testator (the person making the will) in the presence of two witnesses. But what happens if the testator only has a written name? Is that considered a valid signature on a Texas will? In this blog post, we will explore the answer...
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Introduction When you’re making your will, one of the most important decisions you’ll make is who will serve as your personal representative. Your personal representative is the person who will be responsible for carrying out your wishes after you die, so it’s important to choose someone you trust implicitly. There are a few things to...
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When a family member passes away, it can be difficult to know what type of records they had in their possession. You usually need this information before you start planning a probate administration. If you don’t know where to begin, take a look at the list below for some guidance on what you should look...
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11probate court change of will
Legal Terminology Self-proved will laws A will that can be validated without the use of a probate court. Such a will usually requires the presence of witnesses who attest to the will’s validity. Presumption of Continuity When no circumstances exist that suggest a will lacks validity or has been revoked, the burden shifts from a...
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11San Antonio Probate
Introduction If you are an executor or administrator of an estate in Texas, you may be wondering what to do about debt collectors. After all, the last thing you want is for the estate to be hounded by creditors. Read on to find out more about how to deal with debt collectors in independent probate...
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If you’re considering making an online will, you might be wondering if it’s actually legal. The short answer is yes, an online will is just as valid as a handwritten one – as long as it meets all the requirements of a regular will. Keep reading to learn more about what makes a will valid,...
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11San Antonio Probate
What’s the Difference Between an Estate Plan and a Living Trust? If you’re planning for the future of your estate, you may be wondering what the difference is between an estate plan and a living trust. Some people believe they are the same thing. But the truth is they aren’t. There is a significant difference...
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