Who is responsible for the probate administration of a missing person? This is not a question that comes up very often and you typically do not need to know the answer until you are faced with this unfortunate situation.

For example, if you are a beneficiary of an estate, you will probably be dealing with some form of estate probate whether the decedent had a will or most likely a trust. Where there is no will, which is called dying intestate, it is determined by Texas law who controls the probate administration of the estate of the person who has died.

What You Need To Know

When a person is missing or presumed dead under Texas law, there are specific statutory requirements as to who can control the probate administration of their estate. Under Texas law, the following individuals may serve as the administrator of a missing person’s estate:

-The spouse of the missing person

-A child or grandchild of the missing person, over the age of 18

-A parent or sibling of the missing person

-A close friend or relative of the missing person

The process of probate administration for a missing person in Texas begins with the filing of a petition with the court by one of the aforementioned individuals. The petition must state the facts surrounding the disappearance of the individual and must be accompanied by an affidavit from at least two people who have personal knowledge of these facts.

Once the court is satisfied that there is enough evidence to presume the individual to be dead, they will issue an order appointing an administrator for the estate. The administrator then has all the same powers and responsibilities as if the individual had died intestate. This includes collecting assets, paying debts and distributing any remaining assets to beneficiaries according to Texas law.

If you find yourself in this situation, it is important to seek legal advice from a qualified attorney who can guide you through this complex process.

Estate administration is the process of managing a deceased person’s financial affairs. This includes collecting assets, paying debts and distributing any remaining assets to beneficiaries. In most cases, the estate administrator is named in the deceased person’s will. If there is no will, the court will appoint an administrator.

The probate process can be complex and time-consuming, so it’s important to have a clear understanding of your responsibilities before you begin. Here are five things you need to know about estate administration in Texas:

1. Who can serve as administrator? In Texas, if a person is missing and presumed dead, any of the above-named individuals may serve as the administrator of their estate under Texas Estates Code.

2. How do you open an estate? The process of opening an estate in Texas begins with the filing of a petition with the court by one of the aforementioned individuals. The petition must state the facts surrounding the disappearance of the individual and must be accompanied by an affidavit from at least two people who have personal knowledge of these facts.

3. What are your duties as administrator? The administrator then has all the same powers and responsibilities as if the individual had died intestate. This includes collecting assets, paying debts and distributing any remaining assets to beneficiaries according to Texas law.

4. How do you close an estate? Once the estate is closed, the administrator will prepare a final accounting of all receipts and expenditures and file it with the court. The court will then issue an order releases the administrator from his or her duties.

5. When can you receive compensation for your services? Under Texas law, administrators are entitled to reasonable compensation for their services. Typically, this is a percentage of the total value of the estate’s assets.  

Do I need a lawyer? While you are not required to hire a lawyer to help you with estate administration, it is often helpful to do so. A qualified attorney can guide you through the process, answer your questions and help ensure that everything is done correctly. Ask your attorney how to report missing persons.

Do you need a lawyer to probate a will in San Antonio, Texas?

Hire an Experienced Probate Attorney in San Antonio. Do you need help with a probate matter in San Antonio-metro area or the surrounding communities? We are experienced probate lawyers who represent clients with sensitive probate matters. If so, please visit our homepage to see how we can help.

Free Red Letter B Free Standing Letter Stock Photo

Related Questions:

How long before a missing person is declared dead in Texas?

A person is presumed dead in Texas after seven years if he or she has been missing under all of the following circumstances: The person has been absent for a continuous period of five years in which his or her absence was not known to the community in which the person was last seen.

How long does it take to declare someone dead in absentia?

If a person goes missing, the probate administration process can be delayed until that person is declared legally dead. In order to declare a person dead in absentia, usually 7 years must have passed since the last time that person was seen or heard from.

How to find a missing person?

If you have been named as the executor or administrator of an estate, it is your responsibility to locate the missing person. You can hire a professional investigative service or look for the person yourself. The Internet is a great resource and there are many databases that can be searched. You can also check with the local police department or sheriff’s office. They may have received reports of missing persons in your area.

How to declare someone legally dead?

There are a few steps that you will need to follow in order to declare someone legally dead. The first step is to file a petition with the court. This petition must state that the person has been missing for at least 7 years and that you have made a good faith effort to locate them.

The next step is to hold a hearing where you will need to present evidence that the person is indeed missing and that you have made attempts to find them. After the hearing, the court will make a determination as to whether or not the person is legally dead.

If the court declares the person legally dead, then you will be able to move forward with the probate administration process.

What happens when a missing person is found dead?

If a person goes missing and is later found dead, the probate administration process will still need to be followed. 

Related Posts

Leave a Reply